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frugal technology, simple living and guerrilla large-appliance repair

Regular blog here, 'microblog' there

Many of my traditional blog post live on this site, but a great majority of my social-style posts can be found on my much-busier microbloging site at updates.passthejoe.net. It's busier because my BlogPoster "microblogging" script generates short, Twitter-style posts from the Linux or Windows (or anywhere you can run Ruby with too many Gems) command line, uploads them to the web server and send them out on my Twitter and Mastodon feeds.

I used to post to this blog via scripts and Unix/Linux utilities (curl and Unison) that helped me mirror the files locally and on the server. Since this site recently moved hosts, none of that is set up. I'm just using SFTP and SSH to write posts and manage the site.

Disqus comments are not live just yet because I'm not sure about what I'm going to do for the domain on this site. I'll probably restore the old domain at first just to have some continuity, but for now I like using the "free" domain from this site's new host, NearlyFreeSpeech.net.

Wed, 10 May 2017

Microsoft Edge vs. Google Chrome vs. Firefox

I decided to give the new Microsoft Edge browser a try in Windows 10. When I open it, I get this page that says Google Chrome is 5 percent slower than Edge, and Mozilla Firefox is 9 percent slower.

Four things:

  • From my use, I would figure that Chrome is at least 25 percent faster than Firefox.
  • The scores are based on Google Octane, which is being mothballed because everybody is cheating with it.
  • I'm supposed to get excited about a 5 percent speed improvement? Sharing bookmarks and passwords across Google Chrome instances on Windows 10, Windows 7, Linux and Android is more important than a small speed improvement that may not even be real.
  • The more I look at this, saying Chrome is 5 percent slower than Edge doesn't mean that Edge is 5 percent faster than Chrome. Am I right, math and statistics experts? According to my calculations, if Chrome is 5 percent slower than Edge, that means Edge is 19 percent faster than Chrome. Why doesn't Microsoft tout that statistic, which sounds a whole lot better?

Nonetheless, I'm giving the browser a tryout while I'm still using Windows 10.